Airline food

While traveling to and from Seattle this past weekend I decided to see how the airline industry has evolved their food services. Airline food has always had a bad rap and I was curious to see if the industry listened and what they have come up with.
In Detroit the food was pretty mediocre. I chose a Mediterranean Grill where I ordered a beef Gyro and Fries.
The fries were cold ( there’s really no excuse for cold fries….)
and the meat they used was tough and chewy.
Pickles and bell peppers in a Gyro?

In Seattle I went to a well know place called Anthony’s for breakfast. The airport food services were divided between several accounts. I found the food to be excellent and price was surprisingly affordable. I had a smoked salmon and cream cheese omelet with chives, tomatoes, and dill sauce.
It came with potatoes and I had and English Muffin. Very tasty.

I walked around all the food courts in Seattle and Detroit and found many differences.

Detroit stuck to many of the brand name places, (McDonald’s, Chili’s, Pizza Hut,.) There were some interesting places but the menus were plain and mediocre. I guess Fajitas, quessidillas, boring burgers, and the like are here to stay eh???

In Seattle there were more upscale eateries available in the airline terminal. Brand names like Ivar’s and Anthony’s, as I had mentioned, plus there were many cafe’s and bistros, as well, as coffee places everywhere.

One thing I noticed was the large amount of Asian people coming and going from both airports. Instructions that you hear over the speakers are in English as well as 2 Asian dialects.

In Detroit I was hard pressed to find an Asian themed place that was any good. You can tell how good they are by the number of the local population eat there. I found this to be strangely funny.

In Seattle it was a different story all together. I found 3 places, all crowded with Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese patrons. I know this because I asked a manager about the business and he told me which places in the terminal cater to which community of peoples. AND these place were busy.

So, I guess, not surprisingly, The west coast ( and probably the East coast) offer a better variety of food for a perhaps more discerning customer base then does a city like Detroit.
I have been to Chicago and Minneapolis, but years ago, when the food courts were just getting going, so I can not compare.

I would hope to hear from any airline food service workers out there. Take care all.

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