It was doughnut day in class this week.Other teachers and staff would ask, “are you making doughnuts today?” as we walked into class at 7 AM.Everyone was already greatly anticipating fresh doughnuts.

We started out the day like any other.Scaling out all of the ingredients for our mis en place and mixing it off to be set aside to rise.

Yeast Doughnuts

Water 1 lb
Dry Yeast2 oz
AP Flour 4 lbs
Starter* 1 lb
Shortening12 oz
Eggs 8 oz (about 4 eggs)
Sugar 4 oz
DMS 4 oz (Powdered Milk)
Baking Powder 1 oz
Salt 1 oz
Vanilla to taste

*To make a starter, mix 1 package dry yeast with about 4 pounds flour and enough water to make a pancake batter consistency.Let sit for at least 5 hours.Can be made in advance, be sure to keep refrigerated.

Mix all ingredients except shortening until a gluten window develops.Slowly add shortening until dough is smooth.Place in a greased bowl and let rise for at least 1 1/2 hours.

Holy Doughnuts Batman!
Once the dough was ready, it was time to start shaping and cutting the dough.It was than that our chef realized that having each team make an entire batch of doughnuts was a bad decision.Each of our five tables had enough dough to practically feed the entire city of Denver!Not only did we have to fry up all of the dough but we also had 6 other types of breads that needed to be made.

We took two pound lumps of dough and rolled it out to about a half an inch thick.We cut out varying shapes, the traditional rounds, plenty of doughnut holes, and rectangles and squares to make beignets.Set aside to proof until doughnuts have doubled in size.

Each table had a small portable deep fryer, set to 375 F, that we used to cook the doughnuts.Our tiny fryers could only hold about 10 doughnuts at a time, so to finish all of the dough took almost 3 hours!Using the back of a spoon to flip the doughnuts over when they turned golden brow, then waiting for the other side to brown was extremely tedious after about the 150th doughnut I made.

We would than take the hot and crispy doughnuts out of the oil and onto a wire race to cool for a moment before covering them with powdered sugar or one of our glazes.

My personal favorite was the honey glaze.

Powdered Sugar 1 lb
Honey 1 lb
Water 8 oz

Combine all ingredients in a large sauce pan and whisk together.Bring to boil and remove.If glaze seems thin (should be the consistency of a thin honey or molasses) whisk in more powdered sugar.Dip doughnuts in warm glaze and set aside to cool, that is if they make it that far!

Although I am not a big doughnut person, it was hard not to much on these hot little morsels.The entire room smelled like hot doughnuts and the smell wafted down the halls, enticing passers by to stare and beg for a hot doughnut.

The finished doughnuts left the classroom so quicly that I could only snag this last doughnut to take a picture of.This is a cream filled doughnut with dark chocolate glaze and chocolate sprinkles.And, yes, it tasted as good as it looks!